Roald Amundsen

Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, born July 16, 1872, near Oslo. He was the first to sail from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean by way of the Northwest Passage.

Jacques Cousteau’s 1971 book, “Diving for Sunken Treasure,” sits on the nightstand beside my bed, with hope — one magical night the book pulls me in, sitting me on a coral reef watching.

The adventure involves Cousteau’s underwater research into the graveyard of the Atlantic Ocean, describing the expedition to the Silver Bank in the Caribbean, where the crew of the Calypso spearhead a centuries-old shipwreck for its secrets and possible fortune.

In between the explicit details of arduous trips up and down to the site, Cousteau spins tales of those who came before — the pirates, privateers and royalty seeking success in the savage, undulating salty waves and the prices paid.

Like that of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, born July 16, 1872, near Oslo. He was the first to sail from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean by way of the Northwest Passage. And leading a party of five, he became the first to successfully reach the South Pole, Dec. 14, 1911, taking in the penguin chicks, seals and humpback

whale sightings.

Later, it is reported Amundsen disappeared on June 18, 1928, while flying on a rescue mission in the Arctic. Even more amazing was the craft in which Amundsen disappeared, a French Latham 47 flying boat, a twin-engine vessel designed and built for the French Navy, worthy of a Google search.

According to research, three months later, the search for Amundsen and his crew was called off by the Norwegian government; the bodies were never found.

Seeking his motivation I read when Amundsen was 15, he was captivated by the narratives of Sir John Franklin, a British Royal Navy officer and Arctic explorer. Amundsen wrote, “I read them with a fervid fascination which has shaped the whole course of my life.”

And born in Atchison, Kansas, in 1987, Amelia Earhart, was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, disappearing July 2, 1937.

While the sense of adventure is within, the compulsion to discover — at all costs — an enviable, worthwhile and important urge, did not find me, however, other expeditions exist.

“Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it; and you will find rest for your souls,” Jeremiah 6:16.

Appreciating the honorable pursuits; and that is all.

News Editor Carolyn Harmon can be reached at charmon@rrdailyherald.com or 252-410-7058.

News Editor Carolyn Harmon can be reached at charmon@rrdailyherald.com or 252-410-7058.